Why the Urban Heat Island Effect Needn't Make Our Cities Sizzle


The heat island effect alters the climate of metropolitan areas. Buildings and roads in urban areas readily absorb solar radiation and convert that energy into heat. The extra heat makes urban neighborhoods several degrees hotter than similarly located rural areas.
The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation recommends planting trees to counteract the heat island effect. Trees reduce the heat island effect by blocking sunlight from reaching streets and buildings. They also take in liquid water through their roots and release it as water vapor through their leaves in a process called evapotranspiration. The water reduces the heat around it when it coverts from liquid to gas.


Full post: Why the Urban Heat Island Effect Needn't Make Our Cities Sizzle

0 comments: